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EUROPE DESTINATIONS
 SCOTLAND: THINGS TO KNOW
 SAMPLE TOURS SCOTLAND
SCOTLAND GOLF COURSES
 
ABERDEEN & NORTH EAST HOTELS
 
 
CASTLES HOTELS
 
 
CENTRAL HOTELS
 
 
EDINBURGH & SOUTH EAST HOTELS
 
 
GLASGOW & SOUTH WEST HOTELS
 
 
INVERNESS & HIGHLANDS HOTELS
 
 
ST. ANDREWS / EAST COAST HOTELS
 
 
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GOLF IN SCOTLAND - THE HOME OF GOLF

Welcome to Scotland, The Home of Golf. Scotland holds a very special place in the hearts of all golfers as the home of golf. The history and tradition of the game follows the visitor on virtually every step of any Scottish golfing vacation.

Scotland offers 550 golf courses throuhout the country , ranging from world famous courses to lesser known champions, this is a country with a wealth of superb challenges, providing golfing experiences to be found nowhere else.

Every golfer who visits Scotland once, only learns that once is not enough. It would take a decade of vacations to play all the courses that demand to be played and a decade longer just to play them just one more time.

It's an exciting time for golf in Scotland and considering the quality, value for money and range of golf courses with accommodation to suit every golfers needs, your first choice for a golf holiday has to be Scotland.

HISTORY OF GOLF IN SCOTLAND

While many countries have a valid claim to an early game that resembles the game of golf, the origins of golf are without a doubt routed in Scotland's past. The fact is, golf probably derived from other countries and stick and ball type games. However, while these are stick and ball games, they are missing that vital ingredient that is unique to golf. The hole. It was the Scots who introduced the golf hole into the game we now call golf.

Over the centuries, golf has evolved into the game it is today. The first recognizable form being played in Scotland in the early 1400's. Andrews, Scotland is the birthplace of the game golf. Originating on the east coast of Scotland, golf quickly became the Scots' national pastime and passion, bound forever to Scotland's history and people.

According to Scottish lore, the people of Scotland believes that Golf was invented by Scottish fishermen to amuse themselves on the way home from fishing. In 1457 golf was banned in Scotland because it interfered with the practice of archery, which was vital to the defense effort. The ban on golf had been issued in a time when Scotland was preparing to defend itself from the English. Scotland can say that they are the founding fathers in regards to the oldest golf course. It was in Scotland that the passion for golf came alive. There is general agreement among historians and golf fans alike that the Scots were the first golfers who became somewhat addicted and passionate about the sport. In the very early days of golf, each golf group in Scotland produced their own and unique rules, which was sometimes the cause for interesting discussions.

Golf is still a very popular game today in Scotland today. The game of golf soon spread to areas outside of Scotland. In one form or another, the variant games of present day golf were clearly enjoyed throughout Europe in the Middle Ages. In fact in seventeenth century Dutch landscapes commonly show golf being played on ice. The game of golf began its destiny in time towards becoming popular around the world.

Bobby Jones
 The Claret Jug

The Swilken Bridge, St Andrews GolfSt Andrews Old Course Club HouseGolfing Breaks

THE LEGEND

OLD TOM MORRIS

Old Tom Morris
(1821-1908) 

Old Tom Morris is the most influential figure in the early (pre-1900) history of golf. He was a greatplayer, clubmaker, greenskeeper and course designer.

Morris was born in St. Andrews and apprenticed himself to Allan Robertson, considered by golf historians to be the first golf professional. Robertson made featherie balls, and taught Morris the trade. The two often paired together in matches, and according to legend, were never beaten.

When the gutta percha ball arrived on the scene, however, the two split. Robertson demanded that Morris join him in condeming the new ball, thus protecting the featherie business. Morris recognized the guttie as the future, and left Robertson's side in 1849.

Morris left St. Andrews to join Prestwick, where he served as "keeper of the greens." Prestwick hosted the first British Open in 1860, where Morris finished second. But Morris would win four Open Championships during the decade.

In 1865, he returned to St. Andrews as greenskeeper - a position he held until 1904 - and established a clubmaking shop near the 18th green. The 18th green is today named in honor of Old Tom Morris.

Morris pioneered many of what are now considered the first modern approaches to greenskeeping. He also was one of the first great course designers, taking a role in designing or remodeling around 75 courses according to the World Golf Hall of Fame.

Among those Old Tom helped shape are Prestwick, Royal Dornoch, Muirfield, Carnoustie, Royal County Down, Nairn and Cruden Bay - still some of the most famous golf courses in the world.

Old Tom Morris still holds two British Open records: oldest champion (age 46 in 1867) and largest margin of victory (13 in 1862). He played in every British Open until 1895.

Morris' son, who would win four British Opens himself, was born in 1851. But Young Tom Morris died on Christmas Day, 1875, just a few months after his wife and child died during childbirth

Major Championships: 
British Open: 1861, 1862, 1864, 1867

Awards and Honors:
Member, World Golf Hall of Fame

Trivia:
In 1899, Old Tom Morris took on an apprentice greenskeeper at St. Andrews. That apprentice was Donald Ross, the future golf design genius
.

 
 
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